New year’s Resolutions for those with disordered eating

NEW YEAR
NEW YOU?

If you have an eating disorder of any kind, or have had in the past, there are some new year’s resolutions that you must avoid at all costs.

These include:

All dieting behaviours/ diet plans and programmes, weight loss mantras and rituals

Fitness regimes for a new you

Any notation of ‘fixing’ oneself

Attempting to make drastic body changes

 

These will not help you and can of course be triggering.  If those around you are making such resolutions, remember that resolutions will be broken.  Give them a month tops. Because we aim too high and we are only human.

 

Should you avoid resolution making entirely?

Not necessarily.

 

You can empower yourself and utilise positivity.

 

Support yourself with resolutions such as:

 

  1. ‘I will get support this year’, or, ‘I will keep going with the support I am receiving from my professional practitioner’.

This supports your recovery, moving toward health and does not support disordered eating.

 

  1. Choose a positive intention (rather than a soul-destroying impossible goal) for the year ahead. This can be based mostly on feelings.  Such as,

‘This year, I want to flourish’

‘In 2017 I want to feel a sense of gratitude’

‘I want to find a stronger sense of self this new year’

‘This year I want to feel free and more alive’

 

  1. You can choose a resolution that focusses upon you and your own traits and your relationships with others.

Such as,

‘I want to practice more self-compassion and work out how’

‘I will go through my approvals each week’

 

  1. Rather than making changes or applying control, focus on kindness and self-care.

‘In 2017, I will be kinder to my body’

‘This year I will try to walk in the fresh air when I feel anxious or stressed’

‘In this new year, I shall try to let go of the ED/ critical voice as best I can because it serves me no purpose.’

 

This is a new time, but think about using this new beginning to take the opportunity to be calmer and kinder to yourself.  Think about recovery and how best to pursue it for your own health and happiness.

Never try to create a ‘better you’.  You are doing the best you can.  If you could have done otherwise, you would have.  Look how far you’ve come.  And now, how can you find a way to ask for what you need to progress even  further?